How to Build Your Way Up to Taking a Scottish Shower

woman-in-the-showe

The name’s shower, Scottish shower. Britain’s favorite spy is a known indulger in this particular self-care activity. For the uninitiated, the “Scottish shower” is a piping hot shower that ends with at least a minute of icy cold water.

The health benefits have been touted all around the web, including stimulating fat loss, improving skin and hair, enhancing circulation, boosting immune systems, and even helping you sleep better. The mental workout isn’t so bad either; that frigid minute of misery is an excellent test of willpower and discipline, tolerance, and acceptance, not to mention a practice in gratitude that will certainly make you thankful for the more comfortable moments in life. Some even claim that withstanding cold conditions can cure an extensive list of serious ailments.

So now that you know why the Scottish shower should be your new normal, here’s how to work your way up to it.

Start off slowly
The whole point of the Scottish shower is to make a habit of it and continue to shock your body into action on a daily basis. The best way to build a new habit is to start slow so that you don’t exhaust your efforts on the first go-round. Slowly increase the time spent under the chilling spout as you grow used to the strain

Keep track
The average person takes about 66 days to form a new habit, so focusing on consistency is key. Using a tracker (either an app version or good old pens and paper) will help hold you accountable and let you see the progress you’ve already made. Just so that we’re clear, we are asking you to log your showers, yes.

Get breathy
The shocking cold of the water will pull you sharply into the present moment, making distraction difficult to come by. In order to stick it out when time slows to a crawl, practice some breathing exercises to up your endurance. A little bit of chanting here and there can help, too; use whatever motivates you, whether it’s pumping yourself up with a Spartan yell or unleashing a slew of curse words that actually can relieve some pain.